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dc.contributor.authorBabirekere-Iriso, Esther
dc.contributor.authorMortensen, Charlotte G.
dc.contributor.authorMupere, Ezekiel
dc.contributor.authorRytter, Maren J. H.
dc.contributor.authorNamusoke, Hanifa
dc.contributor.authorMichaelsen, Kim F.
dc.contributor.authorBriend, Andre
dc.contributor.authorStark, Ken
dc.contributor.authorFriis, Henrik
dc.contributor.authorLauritzen, Lotte
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-20 18:53:34 (GMT)
dc.date.available2017-11-20 18:53:34 (GMT)
dc.date.issued2016-05-28
dc.identifier.urihttp:/dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114516000817
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10012/12648
dc.descriptionPublished by Cambridge University Press in the British Journal of Nutrition. Babirekere-Iriso, E., Mortensen, C. G., Mupere, E., Rytter, M. J. H., Namusoke, H., Michaelsen, K. F., … Lauritzen, L. (2016). Changes in whole-blood PUFA and their predictors during recovery from severe acute malnutrition. British Journal of Nutrition, 115(10), 1730–1739. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114516000817. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © The Authorsen
dc.description.abstractChildren with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) with complications require in-patient management including therapeutic feeding. Little attention has been given to the effects of these feeds on the essential fatty acid status of children with SAM. The objective of this study was to describe changes in the PUFA composition in whole blood in children with SAM during treatment and to determine predictors of change. This prospective study took place in a paediatric nutrition rehabilitation unit in Kampala, Uganda, and assessed whole-blood fatty acid composition of children with SAM at admission, transition, discharge and follow-up (8 and 16 weeks). ANCOVA was used to identify predictors of change in whole-blood PUFA. The study included 120 children with SAM and twenty-nine healthy control children of similar age and sex. Among the SAM children, 38% were female and 64% had oedema. Whole-blood n-6 PUFA proportions increased from admission to follow-up, except for arachidonic acid, which decreased by 0.79 (95% CI 0.46, 1.12) fatty acid percentage (FA%) from admission to transition and 0.10 (95% CI 0.23, 0.44) FA% at discharge. n-3 Long-chain (LC) PUFA decreased by 0.21 (95% CI 0.03, 0.40) FA% at discharge and 0.22 (95% CI 0.01, 0.42) FA% at 8 weeks of follow-up. This decrease was greater in children from families with recent fish intake and those with nasogastric tube feeding. Current therapeutic feeds do not correct whole-blood levels of LCPUFA, particularly n-3 LCPUFA, in children with SAM. Increased attention is needed to the contents of n-3 LCPUFA in therapeutic feeds.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Copenhagenen
dc.description.sponsorshipAugustinus Fondenen
dc.description.sponsorshipBrodrene Hartmanns Fonden
dc.description.sponsorshipArvid Nielsens Fonden
dc.description.sponsorshipAxel Muusfeldts Fonden
dc.description.sponsorshipAase and Einar Danielsens Fonden
dc.description.sponsorshipTorkild Steenbecks Legaten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.subjectPufaen
dc.subjectSevere Acute Malnutritionen
dc.subjectRecoveryen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.titleChanges in whole-blood PUFA and their predictors during recovery from severe acute malnutritionen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBabirekere-Iriso, E., Mortensen, C. G., Mupere, E., Rytter, M. J. H., Namusoke, H., Michaelsen, K. F., … Lauritzen, L. (2016). Changes in whole-blood PUFA and their predictors during recovery from severe acute malnutrition. British Journal of Nutrition, 115(10), 1730–1739. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114516000817en
uws.contributor.affiliation1Faculty of Applied Health Sciencesen
uws.contributor.affiliation2Kinesiologyen
uws.typeOfResourceTexten
uws.peerReviewStatusRevieweden
uws.scholarLevelFacultyen


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