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dc.contributor.authorDean, Jasmine
dc.contributor.authorPurdon, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-17 20:21:44 (GMT)
dc.date.available2021-06-17 20:21:44 (GMT)
dc.date.issued2021-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2021.100648
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10012/17112
dc.descriptionThe final publication is available at Elsevier via http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2021.100648. © 2021. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.description.abstractLeading models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) assume that compulsions are enacted to neutralize distress over obsessions. However, lab-based research suggests that once a compulsion starts factors other than distress cause it to persist. There have been few studies of the persistence of compulsions as conducted in people's own environments. The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend existing findings by having participants with OCD (N = 36) keep diary records of their target compulsion once a day for six days, using a tablet app based on Bucarelli and Purdon’s (2015) Repeated Actions Diary. Key findings were: beliefs about obsessions had a modest association with distress over the obsession, but neither beliefs nor distress were strongly associated with compulsion duration or repetitions. Compulsion goals were often framed in ways that rendered them impossible and unverifiable (“get rid of all the germs”) rather than harm avoidance or distress reduction. Compulsions were not repeated often, particularly washing compulsions. One of the most important compulsion goals was to avoid being held responsible for harm by others, and this may warrant further study. It may be helpful in treatment to identify and address compulsion goals. Continued study of compulsions is warranted.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Insight Grant number 50656-10036 awarded to the first authoren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders;30
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectOCDen
dc.subjectcompulsionsen
dc.subjectobsessive-compulsive disorderen
dc.titleAn in vivo study of compulsionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDean, J., & Purdon, C. (2021). An in vivo study of compulsions. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 30, 100648. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2021.100648en
uws-etd.embargo.terms2023-07-01en
uws.contributor.affiliation1Faculty of Artsen
uws.contributor.affiliation2Psychologyen
uws-etd.embargo2023-07-01en
uws.typeOfResourceTexten
uws.peerReviewStatusRevieweden
uws.scholarLevelFacultyen


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
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